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CLINICAL

Aflibercept rivals laser for diabetic retinopathyIntravitreal aflibercept worked better than panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in a new head-to-head trial, according to researchers.
Optimize patients’ CL experience by avoiding 3 bad habits
Optimize patients’ CL experience by avoiding 3 bad habitsJust as ODs develop good habits, there are bad habits that we should avoid. Avoid the following three habits to optimize your patients’ lens wearing experience.
New molecule enhances effect of anti-VEGF therapy for DMEActivation of Tie2–as a result of subcutaneous administration of AKB-9778 (Aerpio Therapeutics) in combination with an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy–enhances the effect of an anti-VEGF drug on diabetic macular edema (DME).
Insights from anti-VEGF pivotal DME trialsAnalyses of data collected in the RISE/RIDE and VIVID/VISTA clinical trials provide important messages about the efficacy and safety of ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) and aflibercept (Eylea, Regeneron) for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME).
Endocryotherapy shows potential for hemangioblastoma
Endocryotherapy shows potential for hemangioblastomaEndocryotherapy is a good treatment option for patients with larger retinal angiomatous tumors.
NRTIs hold promise for preventing or treating AMDNucleoside-reverse, transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) or their derivatives could one day be used to prevent or treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to Jayakrishna Ambati, MD.
Presbyopic IOLs changing game for astigmatic patientsPresbyopia-correcting IOLs are changing the preoperative patient education discussion, making it easier for surgeons. However, the need for precision measurements and careful surgical technique may be more important than in the past.
New products, advancements in dry eyeDavid Kading, OD, FAAO, FCLSA, discusses new products, studies, and patient education available to help combat dry eye disease.
Preparing your patient for PRKPhotorefractive keratectomy (PRK) was the original excimer laser procedure approved by the FDA—and is still a safe and effective treatment of refractive errors. PRK has the benefits of no-flap creation; therefore, there is no risk of flap complications.
Growing attention turns to cerebrospinal fluid pressure in glaucomaCataract surgery in patients with coexisting uveitis is more challenging than managing either condition alone.