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CLINICAL

Cannabis remains problematic for glaucoma
Cannabis remains problematic for glaucomaDespite the legalization of marijuana by several state governments, physicians should not recommend smoking it as a treatment for glaucoma, said Sunita Radhakrishnan, MD. “It has been approved by public opinion rather than regulatory process,” she said.
MACRA changes deemed likely to survive new administrationOphthalmologists are likely to continue grappling with changes brought about by the Medicare Access and CHIPS (Children’s Health Insurance Program) Reauthorization Act (MACRA) under the administration of President Donald J. Trump, according to Ruth D. Williams, MD.
How OCT innovations are changing glaucoma careOptical coherence tomography (OCT) is swiftly improving the diagnosis of glaucoma, according to Joel S. Schuman, MD, who helped invent the technology.
Rochester University researcher awarded 2017 Shaffer PrizeFor his research efforts to better understand the molecular pathways that are responsible for axonal degeneration in glaucoma, Richard Libby, PhD, was awarded the 2017 Shaffer Prize for Research during Thursday night’s Glaucoma 360 annual Gala.
Glaucoma 360 expands its ‘horizons’ with new program, sessionsOver the years, Glaucoma 360 has brought the concept of innovation in glaucoma to the forefront. This year’s meeting will surpass the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s (GRF) own “Horizons” by adding a few more “degrees” to its 360-degree concept.
Dr. de Juan receives Catalyst Award; opera singer Márquez gets Visionary AwardA renowned ophthalmologist and an accomplished opera singer were the highlight of Thursday night’s Glaucoma 360 annual Gala, when the two were presented with the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s (GRF) highest honors—The Catalyst Award and Visionary Award.
Seeing the reality of artificial vision
Seeing the reality of artificial visionOphthalmology may be one step closer to the hope of providing artificial vision for individuals affected by virtually all forms of blindness.
Ocular surface disease limits surgical optionsPrepare your patient by assessing and treating the ocular surface
Treat-and-extend may lead to better AMD resultsTreating neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) patients with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) on a monthly regimen has produced “great results” in clinical trials, said Prof. Mark C. Gillies, MBBS, PhD. “But what happens after that and what happens in real world practice?”
‘Ideal’ disease control leads to better nAMD outcomesNeovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is well-known as a heterogeneous disease with variable natural history and variable treatment response, said Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS. Many patients do well without monthly treatment as noted in HARBOR PRN arms.