April 2017 Default Cover Image
It’s just usIt’s the time of year when state legislatures convene to do the people’s business. Which means it is also the time optometry undertakes legislation to expand scope of practice to better care for our patients. For better or worse, we are a legislated profession.
Q&A: Katherine Schuetz, OD Optometrist at Little Eyes, Carmel, INI have been really fortunate to enjoy every aspect of optometry, truly.
The case of the blurred disc marginsA 16-year-old female was scheduled for her periodic ophthalmic evaluation to update her spectacle lens prescription. At the visit, she reported a history of migraines, but the remainder of her personal and family medical history was non-contributory. She took no medications and had a history of low hyperopic refractive correction.
7 tips for safer lens wear with cosmeticsA few tips regarding wearing cosmetics and contact lens wear can help our patients wear their lenses with more comfort.
Upgrade your patients to new technologyWith much of the digital revolution occurring after 2008 and most contact lens technology developing well before it, there is an inherent design feature mismatch. The majority of the available contact lenses are not designed for how patients are using their eyes.
The false security of a full scheduleIt is not uncommon to hear people talk about the health of their practices by confidently stating how far they are “booked out.” How long it takes for a patient to get an appointment is often a statement of practice wellness.
How Trumpcare affects optometryThe American Health Care Act (AHCA)—or Trumpcare—will provide fewer people with healthcare coverage than the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or Obamacare, cost more, and significantly reduce Medicaid funding, says the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and other experts.
Offer options to your cataract patientsAs primary-care optometrists, we are the gatekeepers for baby boomers inquiring about cataract surgery. Today’s patients have treatment options available not only to address their lifestyle complaints but to provide them with better vision and possibly reduced dependence on glasses or contact lenses.
Cataract surgery for patients with PXFMom has pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXF) clinically visible in both eyes. She experiences pops of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in one eye and uses glaucoma medications.
How to care for stroke patientsOptometrists are able to address the visual needs of stroke survivors, an underserved population.
How to use tear osmolarity to help treat dry eye diseaseFor the patient, perhaps the most significant symptom of DED is fluctuating or reduced vision.