August 2017 Default Cover Image
Treating blepharitis in the pediatric populationWhen your pediatric patient presents with irritated, itchy eyelids with reddened lid margins, diagnosing blepharitis may be the easy part of patient care. Implementing a treatment regimen for patients who are infants, toddlers, or school-age children, requires optometrists to use not only their knowledge but their clinical art of practice as well.
Managing astigmats when they hit presybopiaFitting toric patients is a breeze today, and we have options to allow those patients to continue to stay in their contact lenses as they become presbyopic.
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIKHow often have you heard a post-LASIK patient say his surgery “isn’t working anymore” or it has “expired?” While the corneal tissue that was ablated is gone forever, eyes can change over time, and laser vision correction does not stop time.
Using virtual reality in your practiceInnovative technology is certainly one way to catch a patient’s attention. Most patients will appreciate ODs who are not only current but use state-of-the art technology.
Epicutaneous immunotherapy may transform allergy treatmentAs an allergy sufferer myself, I tend to pore over the journals and literature to learn what new exciting technologies may be on the horizon. When I came across epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT), my mind went in a multitude of different directions about the endless possibilities for both systemic and ocular allergy management.
Why the periphery matters in DR progressionDiabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients is a common finding in optometric practices. When we grade the level of retinopathy, we often do so with findings of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS)in mind.
Q&A: Linda Chous, ODPediatric optometry, cosmetology, and giant tubs of popcorn
Perspective changes after my cataract surgeryWe ODs have an inherent advantage our patients do not—we know what’s coming.
Reviewing anterior segment ARVO 2017 postersSo much basic science research is presented at this meeting, and most of it will be years before it makes its way to clinical trials. Let’s concentrate on research that might be of use to us in the exam room very soon.
Top 10 vision therapy booksAs a lecturer and clinical instructor in vision therapy and pediatrics, it is important to have a literature base for what I am teaching. My top 10 favorite vision therapy books provide that evidence base and offer a varied clinical approach for all optometrists who to offer vision therapy in their practices or simply understand the visual process on a higher level.