November 2017 Default Cover Image
Optometry Times names new chief optometric editorBenjamin P. Casella, OD, FAAO, has been named as chief optometric editor of Optometry Times. He succeeds Ernest L. Bowling, OD, FAAO, who held the position for five years.
Hail and farewellThe older I become, it seems the faster time flies. Five years ago, I was asked by someone I greatly respect and admire to become chief optometric editor of this publication. Now, five years later, the time has flown by in a blur, and I am moving on.
Q&A: Chris Lievens, OD, MS, FAAO—Chief of Internal Clinics at The Eye Center, Southern College of OptometryI grew up in a suburb of Washington, D.C. My dad was a federal government employee and so from the time I was born to the time I graduated high school, it was always in the D.C. area—in fact, I went to high school in Washington, D.C. After I went to optometry school, I went into the Air Force and was stationed in Washington, D.C., so we moved back there.
The OD’s role with new diabetes drugsIt is important for eyecare providers to be familiar with these new drugs and findings. We often see patients with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and high CV risk, and we are in a position to help counsel our patients about new treatments—and even suggest that appropriate patients have conversations with their primary-care physicians, endocrinologists and cardiologists.
Using contact lenses to steepen the cornea post surgeryThe over response of LASIK patients is not a common event, but it does happen. CLAPIKS provides a straightforward and practical approach to help patients through this healing period.
Femtosecond advances help ODs, patientsOur patients have numerous choices regarding advanced technology and eye care. Advances range from how patients check in for an appointment to what tools a surgeon uses to dissect tissue. They all have their benefits, and all come at a cost.
The dangers of starting and stopping glaucoma treatmentThe notion of patients not coming in as advised for eye examinations can be troubling. For example, when a patient has an eye disease as potentially significant as glaucoma and chooses to ignore its presence, there is cause for concern on the part of the doctor.
Using OCTA in optometric practiceBy using OCTA technology, we are able to take better care of our patients with retinal disease, make smarter referrals, or be able to hold on to our patients, knowing a referral is not needed.
Using imaging to manage diabetic retinopathyCreating a partnership between the optometrists and retinal practices will enhance the care of patients and serve as a continuing source of education and reference for the OD community. This constant communication will help diabetic patients who are suffering from this multifactorial disease that affects their bodies. DR must be addressed from the optometrist’s point of view, retinal specialist’s point of view, and the primary-care physician’s point of view.
How to diagnose angioid streaksAngioid streaks are a rare but potentially visually debilitating condition that present a unique challenge to the average eyecare provider. Learning to recognize its clinical presentation is just a start in an often difficult diagnosis to differentiate it from other similar retinal presentations. Ultimately understanding its association with a variety of systemic diseases is essential in successfully identifying and mitigating its link to vision loss.
Work with patients to combat contact lens obsolescenceObsolescence happens. If you are not familiar with it, it is the act of becoming obsolete or out of date.