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LATEST NEWS

Women, leadership, and optometryOver the past several decades, the profession of optometry has experienced a gender shift, which research shows is expected to continue. The most recent industry report estimates the female-to-male ratio among practicing optometrists is projected to grow to 52 percent female and 48 percent male by 20221—an increase from 2 percent female and 98 percent male in the 1960s.
When diabetes goes from bad to worseA 30-year-old female with a 16-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes and no other ocular or systemic conditions developed proliferative retinopathy in March 2015. She had not been closely followed for the previous five years.
Glasses and contact lenses: Have they become a commodity?Sell the best thing you have going for you—you.
Considering myopia controlWhy are we seeing higher incidence of myopia, higher degrees of myopia, and earlier age of diagnosis? Research into the answers to these questions has come up with a variety of influences, but because the changes have been observed over such a short time (25 to 30 years) genetics cannot be the only factor.
The changing dry eye dynamicTo understand how far we have come, you must remember where we started.
Optometry Times names new chief optometric editorBenjamin P. Casella, OD, FAAO, has been named as chief optometric editor of Optometry Times. He succeeds Ernest L. Bowling, OD, FAAO, who held the position for five years.
Experts weigh in: What do you wish ODs knew about fitting torics?Our previous story on toric fitting tips went over so well, we decided to bring you more! This time, we asked experts what they wish their colleagues knew about fitting toric contact lenses.
ODs: Rulers of the Land of Presbyopia
ODs: Rulers of the Land of PresbyopiaWe often perform cataract surgery with near vision correction, using monovision or presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs). These folks are typically happy despite having mild residual refractive error. Something magically happens between that patient getting glasses that she “just cannot wear, at all” and getting cataract surgery. Let’s follow that patient’s path.
ODs’ top 4 gripes about vision care plans: Part 4—ReimbursementsOptometrists are increasingly feeling pressure on their practices as vision care plans (VCPs) move toward a model that not only cuts reimbursements but also competes with them for patients, goods, and services.
Considering scleral lenses for astigmatic patientsWe have witnessed a rise in clinical utilization of scleral lenses in recent years, and in some cases, their clinical indications have expanded to include even those patients with regular corneas. Given this sharp rise in scleral lens utilization, the principle of lens selection continuum as proposed by Visser et al appears to also hold true in patients with normal healthy eyes. Thus, when should clinicians reach for scleral lenses when providing care to patients with regular corneas?