Lid and Lash

Increase contact lens comfort by paying attention to the lids
Increase contact lens comfort by paying attention to the lidsPatients present with contact lens discomfort for a variety of reasons. Mile Brujic, OD, FAAO, and David Kading, OD, FAAO, FCLSA, explain why proper lid hygiene may be the key to increasing contact lens comfort.
Prepping the ocular surface before surgery
Prepping the ocular surface before surgeryWith patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery, optometrists ensure a stable ocular surface before the surgeon performs preoperative calculations.
Demodex may be beneficial to humansDemodex has been associated with inflammation of the lid margin and eyelash loss in patients. Take a closer look at mites and microorganisms to consider if, in moderation, they may be beneficial.
Cosmetic dangers: Part 2—Products banned by the FDA, worsen ocular surface disease
Cosmetic dangers: Part 2—Products banned by the FDA, worsen ocular surface diseaseIn Part 2 of her three-part series on cosmetic dangers, Tracy Schroeder-Swartz, OD, MS, FAAO, focuses on the dangers found in cosmetics—particularly cosmetics banned by the FDA and those that may exacerbate ocular surface disease.
Why you should add upper lid eversion to your comprehensive exam
Why you should add upper lid eversion to your comprehensive examComprehensive ocular examinations can provide an OD with an inside look into a patient's health. Mile Brujic, OD, and David Kading, OD, discuss the importance of using upper eyelid eversion during the exam to unleash significant information about a patient's ocular surface and systemic health.
Cosmetic dangers: Part 1-Popular cosmetics patients use
Cosmetic dangers: Part 1-Popular cosmetics patients useIn Part 1 of her three-part series on cosmetic dangers, Tracy Schroeder-Swartz, OD, MS, FAAO, outlines what types of cosmetic products are available and what they do.
How to treat patients with delusional parasitosis
How to treat patients with delusional parasitosisDelusional parasitosis or Ekbom’s syndrome is a patient’s mistaken belief that he is infested by parasites such as mites, lice, fleas, spiders, worms, bacteria, or other organisms. Scott Schachter, OD, discusses the challenges ODs face when working with these patients.
A new tool for managing ocular surface disease
A new tool for managing ocular surface diseaseThe mainstay of our therapy today consists of artificial tear preparations, surfactant lid cleansers, warm compresses for the eyelids, and the occasional antibiotic solution or ointment—this is the exact same therapy that was in vogue for treating OSD 25 years ago!