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September 2016 OP0916_Cover_300x409.jpg
5 ways to go beyond baby shampoo for lid hygieneCertainly, one would assume that nothing could be safer than a product designed for use with children. Television commercials with smiling, happy babies covered in frothy bubbles imply the product is harmless. Ubiquitous marketing alone creates a subconscious sense of safety for both doctor and patient.
4 steps to beating blepharitisBlepharitis is an inflammatory condition of the eyelids leading to red, irritated, itchy, and dandruff-like scales that form on the eyelashes.
Understanding and defining MGDThe Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society’s Meibomian Gland Workshop was tasked to sort through the literature to determine proper terminology of conditions affecting the lid margin. Review the terminology, gland anatomy, gland expression classifications, and treatment strategies.
Why accountable contact lens fitting mattersIn order to properly care for our contact lens patients, we have to take responsibility for the changes that are occurring in the tear film under the lens.
Standards of care in treating glaucomaAs technology and glaucoma care evolves, so must our treatment guidelines
5 lens care tips for traveling patientsKeep your patients in safe and comfortable lens wear while on the road
Opternative and 1- 800 Contacts: Two wrongs don’t make a rightThe recent news in our profession was an announced partnership between Opternative and 1-800-Contacts.1 With InstaRx powered by Opternative, customers can “stay home, eat some ice cream, and get a vision exam” according to the 1-800 Contacts website.
Don’t rule out HSV patients for refractive surgeryThe longer the time since the last outbreak, the better
Q&A: Aaron Tarbett, OD, WG Hefner VA Medical Center, Salisbury, NCI always had a goal in mind of being an optometrist. Microbiology was an undergraduate major, but I was focused on getting to optometry school as soon as I graduated high school.
Contact lenses and dry eye: Cause or remedy?Contact lens wearers are dropping out for comfort and vision reasons. Contact lenses can be considered a significant cause of these symptoms if they contribute to an unstable tear film or trigger inflammatory reactions.
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