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May 2016 OP0516_CV1-1.jpg
5 ways to fire a patientAs owners and/or managers of small business, optometrists usually think of firing in terms of how and when to fire an employee or associate. However, there are times when it is necessary and prudent to fire a patient. This is one of the most difficult tasks we encounter, and it is actually very hard to do.
Farewell to Dr. Larry Alexander, my optometric heroI know that I am hurtling toward eternity each passing day, but I don't dwell on it. Life gets in the way, you know? Yet nothing makes you face you own mortality than the death of someone close.
How your practice can learn from successful companiesAn optometric practice is a business just like any other business where the same rules apply—revenues minus expenses equals profit. Too many times we borrow ideas from mediocre businesses, practices, and people.
How diet and nutrition affect diseaseDiet and nutrition play significant roles in the maintenance of health and prevention of disease.1,2 Every five years, our government releases dietary guidelines based upon all the players in the “food fight.
How a multi-component nutritional supplement benefits diabetic patientsWe all know the typical algorithm for our patients having diabetes: Maintain healthy blood sugar and pressure control, get annual dilated eye examinations, and receive laser or anti-VEGF therapy if and when they develop vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (DR).
How alcohol consumption correlates with glaucomaWith the advent of electronic health records, it is now easier than ever to keep up with what medications a patient is actually taking, and (especially in the arena of glaucoma) the several classes of medications, such as steroids, beta blockers, and antihistamines, that can influence how patients’ eyes behave. With this in mind, I had a patient come in the other day with an interesting question regarding her intraocular pressure (IOP).
How to offer concierge-like care without the feeI like to describe my practice as “concierge like.” We are all familiar with the concept of MD VIP practices. They require patients to pay a flat fee to be part of the practice’s patient base, and, in return, the patient has free access to his physician at any time.
Clinical laboratory testing in optometry: Next frontierIn this issue you'll find an article on clinical laboratory testing for optometry. It is my new passion. It’s something I do in my office on a daily basis, and I find it really helps me in my clinical decision-making.
How point-of-care diagnostic lab tests help clinical decisionsPoint-of-care (POC) diagnostic laboratory testing is not common in eye care. This is not due to any lack of clinical need—it is rather the result of a lack of specific tests known to demonstrate diagnostic and/or treatment relevance to the optometrist and a general resistance to adopting new diagnostic technologies.
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linkingAfter much anticipation and a long wait for both clinicians and patients in need, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved corneal cross-linking (CXL) in mid April. This procedure is globally considered the only method of halting the progressive family of diseases called corneal ectasias, including keratoconus.
Q&A: Bryan Rogoff Principal and consultant for EyeExec ConsultingI enjoyed patient care, but I wanted to do more with my career. I didn’t necessarily look at patient care as where I wanted my career to be. I was recognized to be able to marry clinical and business and mediate communications between the two.
Will the SMILE procedure replace LASIK?The femtosecond laser has brought many significant advances to eye surgery. For more than a decade, it has been used to create lamellar corneal flaps for laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), and more recently this laser is used to precisely perform several steps in cataract surgery.
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