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October 2016 OCTCover.png
Handling patients who want you to adjust glasses purchased onlineGone are those simple days when nearly all patients purchased glasses from their eye doctors’ offices. Online eyewear vendors have exploded onto the scene, and the fallout includes the doctor/patient relationship.
5 zones of your practice that need TLCTrue success comes from consistently giving attention to every part of the practice, not focusing all of your attention on one area at a time.
6 contact lens wear and care habits for patients and ODsAs a profession, we have seen the benefits of transitioning patients to contact lens modalities that are replaced frequently. Innovations in material technologies have allowed advanced designs, including greater oxygen permeability to provide a healthier, more comfortable wearing experience.
The case of the disappearing drusenAt her periodic eye examination, a female patient in her early 70s was discovered to have low-risk macular degeneration in each eye. Further evaluation revealed that her visual acuity (VA) was correctable to 20/25 in each eye.
Why I’m thankful for optometric conferencesI recently had the opportunity to do something I’d never done before: attend a conference that had absolutely nothing to do with optometry. Now some of you will ask, “Don’t you go to enough of those things as it is?”
Complementary and alternative medicine help dry eye patientsWith the exponential increase of interest in dry eye or ocular surface disease (OSD) among physicians and the industry, we are fortunate to have access to exciting new diagnostic and imaging technology as well as new treatment options and therapeutics for some of our most frustrated patients.
4 reasons to use a compounding pharmacyThere are four reasons to opt for a compounding pharmacy instead of reach for your Rx pad: strength, form, ingredients, and function.
Selecting topical regimens for cataract patientsEyecare practitioners who deal with patients in the perioperative period are well aware of the need for topical therapy. In most cases, a combination of a steroid, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and an antibiotic will be used for a few days before the day of surgery and then for a period afterward.
OD Q&A: Philip Aitsebaomo, OD, PhD, FAAORunning for office, diversity in optometry, and mentoring students
Contact lens solution roundupKnow what your patients see when they purchase lens care products
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