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October 2017 Default Cover Image
Considering myopia controlWhy are we seeing higher incidence of myopia, higher degrees of myopia, and earlier age of diagnosis? Research into the answers to these questions has come up with a variety of influences, but because the changes have been observed over such a short time (25 to 30 years) genetics cannot be the only factor.
The changing dry eye dynamicTo understand how far we have come, you must remember where we started.
Top 10 questions about cross-linkingKeratoconus treatment has changed much over the past several years. Avedro’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of corneal cross-linking has given more patients hope for better vision.
How vaping affects the ocular surfaceElectronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are devices designed to deliver nicotine in a solution rather than smoke without tobacco combustion. Perceived by consumers as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes are aggressively marketed as lifestyle-choice consumables.
Forecasting your future performanceLike weather forecasting, forecasting in our optometric practices has also come a long way. Today’s software programs have every imaginable piece of data about our practices. But unfortunately, most of us don’t know how to use the data. The problem is there is so much data and information, it is hard to know what to pay attention to.
Using social media to improve the way you connectHaving a presence on social media is not absolutely necessary to run a successful practice, but it can be a valuable tool in connecting with patients and diverse communities. If used wisely, social media can help grow a practice.
New eye drop assistant helps drive complianceAs ODs, we are fully aware of the challenge patient compliance with prescribed eye drops. To assuage the battle of compliance, eye drop manufacturers are assiduously working to devise drug delivery systems that reduce or eliminate patients’ engagement in the instillation of their prescribed therapy. But until ODs no longer use eye drops, drops remain our primary mode of drug delivery.
Women, leadership, and optometryOver the past several decades, the profession of optometry has experienced a gender shift, which research shows is expected to continue. The most recent industry report estimates the female-to-male ratio among practicing optometrists is projected to grow to 52 percent female and 48 percent male by 20221—an increase from 2 percent female and 98 percent male in the 1960s.
When diabetes goes from bad to worseA 30-year-old female with a 16-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes and no other ocular or systemic conditions developed proliferative retinopathy in March 2015. She had not been closely followed for the previous five years.
Q&A: Craig Thomas, OD: Optometrist Dallas, TXI was born in Houston, moved to Dallas for two years at age 8, moved to Los Angeles for five years, then came back to Dallas. I went to Houston for college and moved back to Dallas 33 years ago when I graduated.
Leveraging the evidence for patient care todayTimes are changing, and the amount of information coming at us from all directions can easily be overwhelming. This information—whether true or false—is unrelenting and has increased in magnitude over the past five years. Part of it may be the natural progression of one’s career and the expansion of one’s network, but most of it is just the sheer volume that is at our fingertips.
Understanding the conundrum of conjunctivochalasisConjunctival chalasis, or conjunctivochalasis (Cch), is a commonly observed condition in our everyday patient care experiences. Because it is so common, and because a majority of patients are asymptomatic, optometrists seldom feel the need treat.
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