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Ocular Allergy Resource Center

New therapies needed for allergy symptoms, quality of lifeHalf of patients with ocular allergies report experiencing symptoms year-round. While nearly all of them take eye drops to treat their symptoms, the majority report limited or no effect from over-the-counter drops, according to a new survey. The results suggest that new treatment approaches would improve both symptoms and quality of life.
Substance P: Dry eye and allergy’s mixed signal or missing link?Inflammation may lead to heightened peripheral sensitization and stimulation through a developing concept in which neuroimmune cross-talk causes the confounding interplay of both signs and symptoms in dry eye and allergic disease.
Topical cetirizine latest therapy to treat allergic conjunctivitisOral cetirizine is one of the most used oral medications for treatment of allergic rhinitis. In May 2017, the FDA approved the first ophthalmic formulation of the second-generation histamine-1 (H1) receptor antagonist for use in treating ocular itching associated with allergic conjunctivitis.
The latest ocular allergy treatments worth watchingProgress of ocular allergy treatment in 2017 starts with the fact that this is a mature therapeutic space, with a range of existing choices for clinicians and patients. Progression in therapies from artificial tears to antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers to topical steroids provides a suitable choice for most patients with ocular allergies.
Intracanalicular insert soothes ocular itching in allergic conjunctivitisA phase III study of dexamethasone insert, 0.4 mg (Dextenza, Ocular Therapeutix) found that the sustained-release intracanalicular insert is safe, effective, and well tolerated for treating ocular itching associated with allergic conjunctivitis.
In treating ocular allergy, ECPs reach first for combo productsIn a poll fielded to Optometry Times and Ophthalmology Times readers, we asked both ODs and MDs what they used for first-line therapy for allergy patients.
Therapy for ocular allergy patients
Surviving allergy season as a contact lens wearerDepending on where you live, spring is here—or at least on its way. It’s the time of year to thaw out along with the trees, grass, and flowers. With spring comes our promise to get ourselves into shape for the summer, and life gets busier with more outdoor activities for the whole family.
Connecting allergy and osmolarityThe major type 1 immunologic hypersensitivity reaction involving the conjunctiva is commonly referred to as allergic conjunctivitis.
Differentiating ocular allergyOn the surface, eyecare providers may not fully appreciate the prevalence and complexity of ocular allergy and its clinical management; we learn that it is a relatively simple disease defined by ocular itch.