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YOUR PRACTICE

In the pipeline: What’s new and what’s coming in optometry technologyKeeping patients informed on the latest procedures and equipment available to treat their disorders is half the battle, says Paul Karpecki, OD, FAAO, at American Optometric Association’s Optometry’s Meeting.
Omnicell System Streamlines Medication ManagementNew technology is helping patients, nurses, and pharmacists alike.
Surescripts Expands Medication History ServiceMore information could help save lives.
Real-life office policies for ODs
Real-life office policies for ODsI thought I would create office policies to control my office life because the patients will follow my long list of rules just like my children listen to rules at home. Feel free to use it at your office.
Intense pulsed light bridges eye care and aestheticsWhat is this age-defying modern technology that a young, nonmedical professional is applying to her face? It is a YAG laser combined with an intense pulse light (IPL).
Three ways technology is improving pharmacyTechnology advances in pharmacy include innovations that improve medication safety, efficiency, and patient compliance.
Baby monitoring in 2017Dr Levine looks at the many baby monitors on the market to find the one that provides the most bang for the buck, all while being easy to use.
Four ways health execs can help their organizations mitigate cyberattacksHealthcare executives are starting to realize that preventing cyberattacks is not just a task for their IT departments and third-party security vendors.
Using technology, medical informatics in patient educationIncorporating new technologies is a must for ODs to improve patient communication and education. Multiple platforms of communication are needed in the 21st century to communicate and educate patients of very different backgrounds.
How to prevent tech revenge at your practice
How to prevent tech revenge at your practiceImagine coming into the office one day and getting word that all of your patient data, past records, tax documents, and financial statements had all been stolen—or worse yet, erased.