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YOUR PRACTICE

The benefits of cleaning out your practice
The benefits of cleaning out your practiceToday, I donated the suit that I got married in. Yep, I took it to the secondhand store and walked away.
Hackathon series puts focus on digital eye careSince the start of the 21st century, technology has revolutionized how we care for our glaucoma, retina, contact lens, low vision, and refractive surgery patients. However, the primary care eye exam has remained relatively unchanged.
Three reasons telemedicine will grow in 2017Technology, and specifically telemedicine, has an enormous role to play in improvements to clinical work flows, care coordination, and long-term health outcomes.
6 financial challenges ODs will face in 2017
6 financial challenges ODs will face in 2017To gauge what the new year will bring, we asked experts to weigh in on what challenges they expect optometrists to face in 2017
Automated health tracking boosts patient engagement, study showsConnected devices and apps eliminating the need for manual tracking drive better long-term engagement in healthy activities, a study from Walgreens and Scripps Translational Science, shows.
ECPs share their New Year’s resolutions
ECPs share their New Year’s resolutionsAs we welcome a new year, now is a great time to look back at what we could have done better in 2016 and set goals for 2017. We asked eyecare professionals from around the country what their New Year’s resolutions are, both inside and outside of the practice.
How data analytics combats the opioid epidemicDeaths due to opioid abuse have risen sharply—and show no signs of leveling off. Here’s how data analytics can prevent abuse and diversion.
Interoperability remains huge hindrance to improved care qualityHigh customer satisfaction has been linked with stronger loyalty, sales, and profits. So why hasn’t the healthcare industry caught on?
Looking back at 2016
Looking back at 2016Before the new year gets too far along, let’s take a brief look at the happenings in the pages of Optometry Times during 2016.
Four ways demand for healthcare data will grow in 2017“Repeal and replace” or “replace and improve” activities on The Hill, though not “business as usual,” won’t necessary slow down data-driven focus areas in healthcare that will continue in 2017.